Psoriasis and Eczema Superfood: Turmeric

Psoriasis and Eczema Superfood: Turmeric

If you’ve done the research on psoriasis or eczema and you’ve explored potential remedies for dry, itchy, red skin, then listening to me tell you that consuming anti-inflammatory foods can help you alleviate suffering is like preaching to the choir. You already know that.

But if you or someone close to you is a newcomer to these skin disorders, one of the first tools in your own personal home-remedy treatment bag should be knowledge. Skin dryness, irritation and redness are often the result of an inflammation of the skin. By ingesting anti-inflammatory herbs and foods, many sufferers claim they have greatly reduced or eliminated those symptoms.

So today, I’m going to tell you about turmeric, an anti-inflammatory spice that some psoriasis and eczema sufferers claim works wonders on their skins and scalps. It’s a primary component of curry powders used in cooking. In fact, it’s the yellow spice that gives curry powder its distinctive color. Many believe turmeric has very strong anti-inflammatory properties, and getting it into your system may work to ward off future flare-ups.

Turmeric has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine and is frequently used today as an herbal supplement. However, the amount of turmeric found in the recipes in your cookbook may not be enough to provide any benefit to psoriasis or eczema sufferers.

So a trip to your nearest store that stocks such herbs is in order, because the stuff that’s been in your spice cabinet for the past six years has most likely lost its potency. But before using any herbs or spices as a supplement, be sure to check with your doctor. In the case of turmeric, those suffering stomach or intestinal disorders might not do well with this spice.

Most good health food stores carry a turmeric root supplement or two, and it will most likely come in the form of a powder, pill or capsule. If you want to really climb up on the home remedy wagon, you can order empty gel capsules online and create your own turmeric capsules at home.

Again, check with your doctor or a reliable pharmacist about dosages. Of course, when considering giving turmeric to children, be sure to check first with your pediatrician.

In addition, turmeric powder can be mixed with water or Aloe vera gel and made into a paste that can be applied to the affected areas of a sufferer’s skin. But don’t go crazy with it, because the spice is also used in dyes and can permanently stain your clothes, not to mention causing discoloration to your skin that’s difficult to wash off.

Using turmeric to ease the symtoms of psoriasis or eczema has reportedly been successful for many sufferers who crowd the Internet with their praises. Results don’t occur overnight, but many claim that after a week or two some begin to notice that flare-ups become less frequent and less severe. Some claim these symptoms disappear completely.

The National Psoriasis Foundation calls turmeric a dietary supplement and it admits a number of supplements have been used by psoriasis patients to control their disease. But the foundation says turmeric has been used by a number of psoriasis sufferers, with recent studies suggesting that it’s not effective in treatment.

Nevertheless, since many traditional medical treatments and regimens have also shown poor results, and many sufferers claim they have experienced relief from suffering by using this popular spice, it comes down to personal preference.

Regardlessalways check with your doctor or a reliable pharmacist about the usage and dosages of dietary supplements.

Do you think you might want to give this yellow spice a try? Let us know how it worked for you by leaving a comment below.

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